SUMMIT SPEAKS OUT ABOUT OLIVER CONNECTING RODS

Summit Racing will tell you up front… don’t buy Oliver Racing connecting rods for a mild street engine build. They’re pretty much overkill for engines that never see the high side of 400hp and revs over 6000rpm. But if you’re building a big-horsepower, high RPM street hero or racing engines, step right up and get a set of Oliver rods.

Oliver Racing makes its parts based on four principles:

Durability: Oliver uses aircraft-quality, American-made 4340 AQ material that is vacuum furnace degassed and inspected for cleanliness. That means better durability and fatigue resistance.

Strength: Oliver uses a two-stage heat treatment process. The first stage is designed to “grow” the best metal grain structure possible. After machining, the rods get a second heat treat to a Rockwell hardness of 38-41—a 20% improvement over its competitors. That means you get a connecting rod with higher tensile and yield strength.

Precision: Oliver’s state of the art machining facility is climate-controlled to within 2° F variance. That means stable material and air temperatures that allow machining to extremely tight tolerances.

Craftsmanship: Oliver has been making connecting rods for over 30 years. Many of its employees have worked at Oliver their entire career, and they use that experience to make the best connecting rods possible.

Summit Racing carries eight types of Oliver Racing connecting rods for all types of racing. Most are I-beam style rods that feature Oliver’s exclusive “Parabolic Beam” design that reduces beam stress and delivers the highest strength-to-weight ratio of any connecting rod currently made. Summit Racing also carries Oliver Racing connecting rods for GM LS engines, GM Duramax diesel engines, and even race-prepped Mistubishi four-cylinder and V6 engines. They also carry replacement wrist pins, bushings, and bolts.

Summit Racing Equipment – 00 111 330 630 0230 (USA) – www.summitracing.com

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